ISSTT Proceedings

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Monolithic Millimeter-Wave Diode Array Beam Controllers: Theory and Experiment

Authors:
L.B. Sjogren, H.-X.L. Liu, F. Wang, T. Liu, W. Wu, X-H. Qin, E. Chung, C. W. Domier, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., J. Maserjian, M. Kim, J. Hacker, D. B. Rutledge, L. Florez, J. Harbison
Abstract:
Power-combining arrays of semiconductor devices offer a promising approach to the realization of compact, reliable, economical systems for watt-level operation at millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave frequencies. Such ("grid") arrays have demonstrated numerous functions at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies in recent experimental efforts. Monolithic diode arrays have demonstrated phase shifting at 93 GHz, frequency doubling from 33 to 66 GHz and frequency tripling from 33 to 99 GHz. One dimensional monolithic imaging arrays have been demonstrated at 94 GHz. Additional quasi-optical functions have been demonstrated at microwave frequencies by arrays employing hybrid technology. These include the oscillator grid, mixer grid, and amplifier grid. The hybrid grids operate on the same basic quasi-optical principle as the monolithic arrays, so the functions demonstrated to-date in hybrid form should be feasible also in a monolithically integrated form at millimeter-wave frequencies. Additional array design approaches have been suggested for further development of millimeter-wave components. Construction of complete systems based on the millimeter-wave array technology requires not only source and detector arrays, but control components for such functions as amplitude modulation, phase modulation, and beam steering. The first effort at addressing this need by a semiconductor device array was an experimental demonstration of a phase shifter at 93 GHz. In this work, phase control of a reflected beam over a range of 70 degrees with 6.5 dB loss was achieved by a monolithic array of Schottky diodes. The stacking of more than one array should allow a phase range of greater than 360 degrees to be achieved. Operated in a nonuniform phase (bias) mode, such an array should be capable of (phased array) beam steering and beam focusing.
Categories:
Sources
Year:
1992
Session:
1
Full-text:
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Page Number(s):
45-57